Of Men and Machines (1963)

A colleague shared with me the most interesting video from 1963, starring Paul Fits, presenting what was then called Human Engineering or Engineering Psychology. It’s an excellent explanation of the Human Factors’ work and goals:

“Engineering psychologists attempt to eliminate (such) confusion not by changing man’s habits, but by changing the machine. They attempt to discover how machines can be designed so that the machine will speak a language which man can understand.”

Paul Fitts

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Update #3

Of my Bucket List.

I had compromised to have these all concluded at the end of December 2016.

I would say I’ve made 3,5 (I am rather autonomous in R already) so…50% success. Humpf.
  • Have made an oral presentation at an international conference;  HFES Europe Chapter, 14th Oct 2015.
  • Have 2 work-related papers published; (1 and 2/2)
  • Have 1 PhD-related paper submitted;
  • Have made sound collections in two different environments (1/2);
  • Have concluded the first and second experimental tasks;
  • Be independent in R, LaTeX, sound capture and it’s edition;
  • Have some sort of project/visit abroad  Summer School in Control Room Verification and Validation in Halden, Norway

Update #2

Of my Bucket List:

  • Have made an oral presentation at an international conference;  HFES Europe Chapter, 14th Oct 2015.
  • Have 2 work-related papers published; (1/2)
  • Have 1 PhD-related paper submitted;
  • Have made sound collections in two different environments (1/2);
  • Have concluded the first and second experimental tasks;
  • Be independent in R, LaTeX, sound capture and it’s edition;
  • Have some sort of project/visit abroad  Summer School in Control Room Verification and Validation in Halden, Norway

Concert-hall Acoustics (3/3)

Pätynen, J., & Lokki, T. (2016). Concert halls with strong and lateral sound increase the emotional impact of orchestra music. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 139(3), 1214-1224.

After several studies and hypothesis, the following experiments were made using skin conductance as an objective measure of arousal or emotional impact. This is interesting to correlate with the previous findings – and something i might be able to do soon.

For the listening tests 28 subjects were chosen. They were either music consumers or music professionals.

In the first experiment, they’ve listened to stimuli the following way:

Pilot signal + 15s Silence + 12 Stimuli (each with 15s Silence)

In the second experiment, participants made paired comparisons between two stimuli, and they had to choose the one that produced a higher overall impact on “you”. Impact was described as thrilling, intense, impressing or positively striking. Again, participants could jump seamlessly between stimuli to make the comparison.

Connecting the results with he plants from the rated concert-halls, it was possible to define the following conclusions:

– Halls with rectangular typology have a more impressive sound (because more sounds reverberate from the lateral directions);

– Positions closer to the orchestra were found to elicit stronger emotional responses.

The methodological interest I bring fromt these three studies is the possibility to seamlessly navigate trhough the stimuli in order to make a rating. this, nevertheless, makes a very specific rating, only to that sample.

Concert-hall Acoustics (2/3)

Lokki, T., Vertanen, H., Kuusinen, A., Pätynen, J., & Tervo, S. (2010, August). Auditorium acoustics assessment with sensory evaluation methods. In Proc. ISRA (pp. 29-31).

After this, I got interested in the method used and looked for more details. It seemed very similar to what I’ve done before with Kansei.

The previous study was made using this graphic user interface, where assessors could seamlessly switch between audio clips (just like between wine sips). The continuous scale ranged from 0 to 120.

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The assessors were recruited via an online questionnaire with three parts: a) a pure tone audiometric test; b) a test for vocabulary skills, c) triangle test for the discriminative skills of audio stimuli (FromWikipedia: The assessors are presented with three products, two of which are identical and the other one different. The assessors are asked to state which product they believe is the odd one out)

20 assessors were selected, all with music background, and each made four sessions in total. In the first two sessions they made the attribute elicitation and in the last sessions they’ve used the attributes and scales.

As for the analysis, the classification of the attributes could be made manually, but it was made with AHC – Agglomerative hierarchical clustering. Than, further analysis were made using Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA), which has a PCA as basis. The results are presented here.